FROM THE ARCHIVE 361 -1995-

1995-SMFrom the 1995 album Shirley Bassey Sings The Movies Eleanor Rigby.
Also below a live performance from the National Lottery Show from the same year.

Eleanor Rigby. Written by John Lennon / Paul McCartney.

Released on the 1995 album Shirley Bassey Sings The Movies. A live recording is available on The Diamond Collection.

In the UK the single “Yellow Submarine / Eleanor Rigby” was on the chart position number one for four weeks in August/September 1966. In the US Billboard The Beatles reached a No. 11 with this song. It is part of the soundtrack of the 1968 movie “Yellow Submarine” and has also been sung by Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin.

This song must have been quite a shock to pop listeners in 1966, as it talks about dead and unfeeling people. According to McCartney, Eleanor Rigby began as a plain tune with a melancholy descending phrase, and the image of a spinster, Miss Daisy Hawkins, sweeping up the rice in a church after a marriage. Armed with only the first verse, McCartney headed for Lennon’s house at Weybridge where, during an informal evening with friends, he and the other Beatles pieced the rest of the song together. Though an “Eleanor Rigby” lies buried close to McCartney’s home, he said that the name was a combination of a clothing shop and an actress’ name. With “the face that she keeps in a jar by the door” they hint at the masking of the despair inadmissible by English middle class etiquette. Eleanor Rigby dies alone, because unable to tell anyone how she felt. McKenzies sermon won’t be heard, and he does not care very much about his parishioners. At the beginning they started with “Father McCartney”, but then it became the more neutral “Father McKenzie”, a name found by consulting a telephone directory.

A comment about the movie “Yellow Submarine” from the internet: Pure delight, a phantasmagorical animated feature with as much to hear as there is to see: Beatles’ songs, puns, non sequitur jokes combined with surreal pop-art visions in story of Beatles trying to save Pepperland from the Blue Meanies.

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Lyrics:

Eleanor Rigby picks up the rice in the church where a wedding has been
Lives in a dream
Waits in the window
Wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door
Who is it for?
All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Father McKenzie writing the words of a sermon that no one will hear
No one comes near
Look at him working
Darning his socks in the night when there’s nobody there
What does he care?

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

Oh, look at all the lonely people
Oh, look at all the lonely people

Eleanor Rigby died in the church and was buried along with her name
Nobody came
Father McKenzie wiping the dirt from his hands as he walks from the grave
No one was saved

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?

Oh, look at all the lonely people
Oh, look at all the lonely people

All the lonely people
Where do they all come from?
All the lonely people
Where do they all belong?

(Transcribed by Roman)

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2 thoughts on “FROM THE ARCHIVE 361 -1995-”

  1. This is a quirky song but I love the way DSB performs it; I remember that evening – my numbers never came up but who cares Shirley was on the box! …. thanks Pieter for all the info.

    Terry.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Fantastic Pieter. I love the background material of the song, interesting. What a great performance by DSB on the show, and she looked gorgeous. I love her rendition of this lovely, poignant song. DSB the Best of the Best.

    Liked by 2 people

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